Results 1 to 34 of 34

Thread: Programming PIC Microcontrollers With PICBasic Chuck Hellebuyck Book

  1. #1

    Programming PIC Microcontrollers With PICBasic Chuck Hellebuyck Book

    Great book!

    If you've taken a beating with MPLAB X IDE and Microchip documentation like I have you'll

    doubly appreciate this book.

    If you want to learn PIC's a book that works for you is WAY better than just

    the mentioned approach.

    Anybody know what development board he's using in the lessons?

    Just curious. Don't want to get one unless I found a couple for a deal on Ebay.

  2. #2
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11

    Is the Hellebuyck book up-to-date?

    I tried to use some of Hellebuyck's tutorials but they always present problems, such as use them for the demo version of PBP3 only. My problem is not understanding PICs or knowing enough assembler to program them, it's the incredible lack of simple, easy to follow, step-by-step instructions for using the combination Microcode Studio, PBP3 Compiller, and MPLAB IDE software once you've installed it in your PC, and what hardware you need. My goal is to get setup with a 14-pin PIC in some kind of socket connected to my PC in some way, edit a PBP3 file, compile it, try it in the MPLAB simulator or debugger (still don't know the difference), revise the code, recompile, retry, ad infinitum until I have a program working the way I want it to, by trial and error. Then burn a chip and put it in my breadboard. Is that too much to ask? I have both legacy PICkit2 and PICkit3, but the maze of development boards, the now-obsolete (?) ICD2 and its array of headers, has me bewildered as to what to buy. I'm an 86 year old fart who's not as bright as in my earlier years, fighting like hell to learn this stuff. Did I mis-understand, and is the Hellebuyck book what I'm looking for?

  3. #3
    Young man

    Littleton CO?

    Drive over to Charles at MELabs with your hardware in a box.

    Refuse to leave until he compiles and programs a PIC for you.

    Just kidding.

    Will post link to Chuck's book. Hang on.

  4. #4
    Okassional

    Here's how you get book.

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-list...condition=used

    Will post link to hardware.

    Download Chuck Hellebuyck version of PIC Basic at MELabs website while you're waiting for book.

    Hang on to your ICD2.

    That will be very useful to you later.

  5. #5
    Okassional

    "step-by-step instructions for using the combination Microcode Studio, PBP3 Compiller, and MPLAB IDE software"

    I spotted your mistake.

    No need for MPLAB X IDE.

    In fact stay away from it until later.

    All that is required is the book for a course of lessons.

    PIC Basic and a hardware programmer and a board with PIC.

    Here's the link for hardware.

    http://www.elproducts.com/

    Somebody supporting a 15 year old book is unheard of in this business.

    It's definitely a deal worth getting in on.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11

    Book is on order

    I have the Hellebuyck book on order. Sure hope it helps.

  7. #7
    Oka

    Alright.

    Well. One thing.

    As long as these email alerts work for posts to this thread.

    I'll be here to answer questions.

    Tip: I've found my way to MPLAB IPE. That's 'P' in the middle not 'D'.

    It usually installs with MPLAB X IDE. If not:

    See if you can install that and test your PICKit 2 and 3 with it.

  8. #8
    Oka

    Just noticed your question.

    "Is book up to date?"

    No. It's not. That doesn't matter for learning basics.

    Once you learn a few things you can 'convert' it to newer chips and different IDE's.

    Different languages for that matter.

    PIC Basic is well 'Basic. MPLAB is Assembler and C.

    You'll know what 'Steps' to look for later after learning one language and IDE.

  9. #9
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11
    Well, I received the Hellebuyck book, two copies in fact by mistake. I read through it and was very disappointed. I would describe the book as an exhaustive analysis of the differences between the PICBasic compiler and the PICBasic Pro compiller, with a lot of good information on PIC processors and programming and a few good examples of simple programs. It is extremely well written, and a good reference for anyone starting out with PICs. But I was looking for step-by-step instructions on using PICBasic Pro with MicroCode Studio and MPLABX and there is NOT ONE WORD about IDE's in the book. In fact, the word MPLAB does not even appear anywhere in the book. It doesn't even describe actually running the PBPro compiler to compile one of the example programs.

  10. #10
    okasional

    Try this.

    Gooligum Tutorials.

    Total cost. $15

    You can download free lessons and see if they are talking your language.

    It is for MPLAB not PIC Basic.

    You can learn that and come back here and know what to look for in a compiler/language.

    Step by step tutorials are hard to come by.

    Microchips have horrible 'info holes' in them.

    'Just do this and it will work'. Wishful thinking!

  11. #11
    I'm not sure what your deep down desire actually is; work with micro controllers, work with PIC specifically, work with MPLAB specifically... If you are totally new to micro controllers and want to get your feet wet, may I suggest PICAXE. It is based on PIC processors, but requires far less of a learning curve to get functional. Many folks use PICAXE for quite complex designs. True, PIC is very versatile with over 1000 part numbers (versus PICAXE having only 7), but you may find it quite a bit easier to get started with the PICAXE.

    As for PIC specific, I ended up purchasing over half a dozen different books, only maybe half of which were of help. Some of the best help came from the tutorials available on the ME Labs web site, and searching this forum for specific topics. For what it may be worth, I got started with PICAXE then evolved into PIC later. The foundation from PICAXE really helped migrate into the more complex PIC 8-bit platform (of course with PBP3). Good luck to you. (I have Chuck's book as well.)

    Mike

  12. #12
    As far as I can tell.

    There ARE NO pic tutorials for free.

    http://store.melabs.com/prod/TEACH/TRAINER-1.html

    Down at the bottom is sample of tutorials.

    Only available with purchase of Trainer.

    If you know where the free tutorials are.

    Please point them out.

  13. #13
    Mike

    I know Basic Stamps pretty well and X86 C language and QBasic.

    It's taking time to find good tutorial for PIC's.

    Gooligum is very good.

    Look out for those 10F200's and 12F508's and '509's though.

    Fragile. You can destroy calibration on them.

  14. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11
    I have the Gooligum board and tutorials. Last time I tried I couldn't get anywhere. I'll look again. I want to program with PBP Pro because that's the only high level language I know, but so far as I can tell Gooligum is strictly C or assembler.

    While searching I found and printed an article published by "Steve" at a forum called Crownhill Associates, whoever they are, entitled "[Beginner Tutorial] How to get started with PICBASIC PRO Demo, MPLAB, & PICkit2". Its opening paragraph says, "So you're new to PBP and want a simple step-by-step guide? This one will show how to get started ..." Seven pages complete with screen shots and everything. Sounds perfect doesn't it? I can get through the page 1 installation phase (more or less) but things crash on page 2. They glibly talk about some Plugins and Suite folders I can't find no matter how hard I try.

  15. #15
    Oka

    Are you using Pic Basic Pro by itself or within Mplab?

    Need to know before making next move.

  16. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11
    Mike,

    Did you ever read my article published in the July 2014 issue of Nuts and Volts magazine entitled "Building Your Own PICAxe Download Cable". Been there, done that, not going there again.

  17. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11
    I haven't tried PBP alone yet because it's just a compiler. I need to be able to use the stuff like MicroCode and MPLAB to get a good editor, simulator, and all the whistles and bells.

  18. #18
    Oka

    Have you been laying in the weeds on me?

    Are you a Picaxe guru?

    Maybe I ought to scrap this for the short term and

    take Picasxe lessons from you?

    I'm a Basic Stamp 'Dangerous Prototyper'.

  19. #19
    Oka

    I think I have your solution.

    Let me know about you using PBC with or without Mplab.

  20. #20
    Oka

    I thought that was the problem.

    No. Don't do that!

    You're taking on two many things at the get go.

  21. #21
    PBC with their D Stick.

    Use ti with Student Edition.

    It comes with tutorials.

    That will get you off square one.

    They are under lock and key until you buy D-Stick.

    It will be just like Picaxe or Stamps programming. One click programming Seems to be a trend.

    PBC is between Stamps/Picaxe and full PIC programming with Assembler and C.
    Last edited by PICBasicUser; 3 Weeks Ago at 07:36 PM.

  22. #22
    Oka

    Make Mplab coding and programming their own areas of learning. PCB by itself too.

    Learn setting up Pickit 3 with IPE first.

  23. #23
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11
    I bought PICBasicPro Student edition with manual and disc. I've read the manual, and was already familiar with Basic. Nothing in the manual of course about how to get beyond editing a program. The disc installed MicroCode but again no info on what it does or how to use it. I ASSUMED either the MPLAB download or the MicroCode disc would take care of integrating the PBP3 compiler with MPLAB and/or MPASM and what all, but no way to tell. Only instructions I have are the tutorial by "Steve" at Crownhill Associates mentioned earlier. One strike against that is it starts out instructing you to download PBPDemo. I think that's a different version than my Student edition. Second strike is it says install a "PICkit2 standalone application". I have no idea what that is or where to find it. But rather than dig out my old PICkit2 I'm going to leave my PICkit3 plugged into the ICSP connector of my Gooligum board. It goes downhill from there. Page 2 of the tutorial says to add the PBP Language Toolsuite to MPLAB by opening the C:\PBPDEMO\MPLAB_Plugin folder and run setup_PBPSUITE. I looked around through MPLAB but can't find a trace of either of these.

    So I followed standard procedure for when you know nothing about what you're doing, charge ahead. When I opened MicroCode Studio it pops up with a "blink" program for a PIC16F688. Didn't have one of those chips for my Gooligum board, so dropped down the processor selection window and selected a PIC16F886 which they offered and I had one of. But if I uncommented the ANSELH instruction that pointed to a 16F88x the program balked and said "Ah ha! Fooled you! I don't support that chip". So I lied and told MicroCode I was using a 16F688 even though the chip in the board was a 16F886. Clicked on the CompileProgram button and it whizzed through with no errors and a notice of "Success: 70 words used". No change on the screen. No clue as to where the compiled file or a hex file might be hidden. Not any signs that MPLAB is even awake or gives a damn. I can't even find out what PICs are supported by either the demo or the student edition of MicroCode Studio. I'm sure all this makes perfect sense to you youngsters, but not to an old fart.

  24. #24
    Okasional

    Do you mind if we do one thing at a time please?

    What version of PBP did you pay for and receive?

    Look at the three versions on this page.

    http://pbp3.com/

    Bob
    Last edited by PICBasicUser; 2 Weeks Ago at 09:09 AM.

  25. #25
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11
    Look at the first sentence of my last post. It says "Student edition".

  26. #26
    ME Labs offers a Tutorial Board for $99. Bought one for my son. That may be the ideal place to start. Demo boards are popular because they eliminate most of the variables and allow folks to focus on learning one thing at a time. As for Micro Studio, MPASM, MPLAB and PBP, use the PBP software as instructed and the software calls all that other stuff automatically. I've been working with PIC for about 5 years now and probably couldn't walk through all the steps manually without a book opened beside me showing me how.

    The PIC Tutorial Board can be found here:

    http://store.melabs.com/prod/TEACH/TRAINER-1.html

    Mike

  27. #27
    "Look at the first sentence of my last post. It says "Student edition". "

    Okay. Let me post screenshot of mine and you say whether it looks the same.

  28. #28
    Name:  PBP 3 Experimenters-Student.jpg
Views: 31
Size:  15.1 KB

    Okasional

    Does yours say Experimenter's on top line?

    That is what Student looks like.

  29. #29
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11
    You'll have to tell me how to see the screen shot. Thanks for the suggestion, but I don't believe throwing another $99 at the problem will solve it. And I don't need another development board in my junk box that has a 40-pin PIC and LCD, neither of which I will EVER use. I did learn something from the Tutorial for ME Labs Trainer though. In paragraph 1.4.2 on pages 11 and 12 it describes exactly what happens in my case, except it also fails to tell where the .asm and .hex files are. But it convinces me that I have at least "proven the operation of MicroCode Studio, PBP (and MPASM)" as the tutorial puts it.

  30. #30
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11
    Name:  MicroCode Opening Page Header.JPG
Views: 29
Size:  34.1 KB

    Here's what mine looks like.

  31. #31
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Littleton, CO
    Posts
    11
    I may be doing better than I thought. I stumbled across the .asm and .hex files for my compile, right in a folder I remember vaguely creating but forgot all about. Now to look for something that invites me to burn the hex file into the chip on my Gooligum board.

  32. #32
    It's open in post.

    Looks like a screenshot.

    About 4x4 inches square.

    I'm using Firefox.

    You might want to try it.

  33. #33
    Okasional

    I say get the D Stick.

    No. I'm not a shill for Melabs.

    Yes. I see you found assembler file and are going to program Pic on your board.

    Okay.

    D stick has tutorials.

    I say get it and if you don't like it or tutorials send it back.

  34. #34
    right in a folder I remember vaguely creating but forgot all about
    As you found out, the output files go into the same folder as your source file.

    Something I find that helps is to turn on the filename path display.
    In MCS main menu 'View | Editor Options... | General tab' check 'Display full filename path in application title bar'

    That helps me remember where I put my files.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •